Soul & Science
Soul & Science

Season 1, Episode · 6 months ago

S1 Episode 3: Indeed CMO Jessica Jensen | The Future of Work

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Indeed CMO Jessica Jensen comes on the pod to discuss the future of work, the importance of change and adaptation, and how Indeed is reframing "the great resignation" as "The Great Realization."

As the Chief Marketing Officer at Indeed, Jessica Jensen is responsible for Brand, Communication, Product, Acquisition, and Experience Marketing globally. Jessica has led high-performance teams at the world's leading technology companies like Yahoo!, Apple, and Facebook. She has built high-impact B2B and product-marketing organizations, as well as had full P&L responsibility for internet media businesses. As former Chief Marketing Officer at OpenTable and Head of Products, Platforms & Insights for Business Marketing at Facebook, Jessica has built strong revenue growth for consumer internet brands via her deep experience in strategic planning and business model development. As Chief Marketing Officer at Indeed.com, the #1 job site in the world, she is passionate about coaching and motivating diverse, high-performing global teams and is a champion of women’s advancement.

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I always wondered if marketing lives in the heart or in the head. Should you trust your instinct or your integers? Often the answers both, but should you lead with one more than the other? So bring your heart and your head and join us in the conversation. This Week I am joined by Jessica Jensen, CMO at. Indeed, she's responsible for brand communication, product acquisition, experience marketing, all of those things globally. That is a big plate of stuff to handle for one person, so we're going to find out how she does it. Jessica has led high performance teams at the world's leading technology companies like Yahoo, apple and facebook. She's built high impact be tob and product marketing organizations, as well as full PNL responsibility for Internet media businesses. As former CMO at open table and head of products, platforms and insights for Business Marketing at Facebook, Jessica has built strong revenue growth for consumer Internet brands via her deep experience of strategic planning and business model development. As CMO at, indeed the number one job site in the world. She's passionate about coaching and motivating diverse, high performing global teams and also is a big champion and advocate of women's advancement. The broad theme today is sort of around the future of work and we're going to talk a lot about change and adaptation, which has really been fast forwarded over the past two years and it's brought seismic changes to the workplace and rather than focusing on the great resignation which everyone talks about, we're going to focus on what indeed dubbed the great realization. Hi, Jessica, welcome to soul and science. Oh, thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure. I always like to start with Jessica, the person, and your background, and your dad was a creative director, which tracks given where you ended up as sort of in the marketing world, is as a CMO and and before that, other marketing jobs. Did you always want to go into marketing because what your dad did look like so much fun, or did you kind of fall into it like many people do when they haven't figured out what they want to do and they think marketing seems fun? How did you find your way into mark the world of marketing? That's a great question. Yeah, so my dad was a creative director, my mom was a speech and communications professor, so I literally grew up at the dinner table as a child writing jingles, reviewing ad copy, watching my dad create pictures for clients and I thought it was Super Fun and interesting and I was basically marinating in marketing as a child. But then over time I decided to want to a diplomat. So I studied Japanese for ten years, I...

...learned Spanish, I lived in Japan for four years, I lived in Latin America. So I went through this massive international relations kick, went to Grad School for that, all this stuff and then kind of in a fluke, ended up going to management consulting after Grad School to quotes, learn business, which I thought was, you know, interesting, but I wouldn't stay in it. That wasn't my passion. Being kind of a business dork for a while, I realized that the art and the creativity were somewhat missing from my life and you know, my dad has always been a great coach to me. And so then, you know, really migrated to marketing over time and kind of really cut my chops more in product marketing, but then got to run some consumer web businesses for Yahoo and do marketing for those. So I've had kind of a wild wander through the business world and now am firmly a marketer. But you know, no, I did not know that's where the road was leading. But you know, I could not be more happy, I think, to the point of this podcast, I now consider myself an artist and mathematician and both of those are as critical as the other in marketing, as you know, and so I get to swim in both of those pools every day and it's delightful. When you were maginating as a child in advertising I, which I love, was there an ad or a product or something that maybe, even even later on, after management, management consultant, was there something that inspired you and you go, okay, that's not marketing. Seems like it could be a lot of fun, because I love this brand or I love this campaign. So I'm old enough to remember the original coke campaign. I'd like to buy the world a coke. Yeah, I don't know if I all of your listeners will remember that, but hopefully they'll go watch it. It was the message was about global unification, love, kindness, generosity and it's still a very moving ad and I remember thinking wow, what a story, what a message, and it makes you feel like coke unifies the world, which we can debate whether or not that's a good thing or a bad thing. Yeah, but it's a very it was a very, very important piece of advertising at that time. And then my dad, I don't know if anybody will remember, there were some Chanel number five TV ads that were so gorgeous. I mean they were was like airplanes flying over swimming pools and beautiful women walking, you know, down beaches and it's...

...just like still one of the most visually gorgeous ads and we would just salivate over that. Yeah, it's still copied. Yeah, yeah, for sure. So, yeah, I mean there are nuggets like that lurking in my in my mind and my heart. So, since you got away from management consulting in a marketing you have gone to three really famous, volatil at times culturally relevant companies, from facebook to open table. Indeed, obviously facebook was in a lot of hot water for free speech or misinformation, anti antitrust. Open table, I know when you started, was right when it got really hit hard by the pandemic, and now the the thing everyone's talking about is the great resignation. was that just random, or were you attracted to companies that were going through it and you thought you could bring your skills to help or and bring order to some of the chaos, or did it just sort of happen? I think bringing order to chaos as a huge theme in my career and kind of an addiction for me. I have a tendency to run towards fires. was there any lessons that you want to share, either from facebook or open table, that stand out for you that you know you wish you did something differently, or something that you did, conversely, that you're really glad you did, because it made a big difference, sure, and very different lessons from those different experiences, I would say. I mean the key lesson from my facebook time is transparency and honesty, and I think we did a lot of good work to be transparent and honest, but there were certain things that I think we kind of bungled the the messaging on. I also don't think that we managed our relationships with the media well and that, that, you know, was a was a significant challenge and and peep by you know, they're still working on those very, very difficult issues. And then it opened table. I'm extremely proud of the speed with which we pivoted to the covid situation and totally reoriented our consumer messages to be around safety as a diner, how to support restaurants and keep our community businesses alive through things like takeout and delivery and our deep engagement with our restaurant customers, helping them understand legislation changes, health regulations, how to get PPE, how to communicate with their customer bases to keep them engaged and coming back. And you know,...

...and we and I think we did a very good job of working with the media on highlighting those issues and trying to keep that industry alive. I'm very proud of the work that we did and that open table is still doing. Yeah, that's great. Yeah. So, I mean the takeaways there are good media relationships, right and making sure your message is clear, transparency so you build trust, and and also trying to not overcorrect but pivot quickly when you have to. Yeah, and I and I would add to that, I have now worked in organization where marketing and COMMS are separate and we're marketing and COMMS are together, and I want to say that I firmly believe that marketing and comes need to live together to get the right messages out across audiences in a coordinated fashion. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Moving on to the new hill you're climbing with. Indeed, when did you start there and what you kind of walk into? I'm sneaking up on a year. I joined at the end of March last year and you know, as you said, walked into fortunately, a very healthy, fast growing business. But the landscape, the macro landscape of labor and, you know, employees supply and employer demand and has been, you know, obviously radically altered in the last two years under covid and it and also, as you said, the definition of work and workplace has radically changed. You know, our mission as a company is to help people get jobs and that means all people around the world. So our marketing to jobs, seat to humans and job seekers, is extremely broadreach. You know, we have two hundred fifty million people coming to our site per month. So we do incredible broad reach marketing to try to reach job seekers. But we also have to be specific and segmented because nurses are not truck drivers, are not accountants and they have very different needs and interests and the kinds of roles that they want are changing. Rapidly over time. We've seen the explosion of e commerce and therefore warehousing, delivery packaging are just exploding and the demands for Labor in those areas, healthcare exploding, aging populations around the world, not not only covid driving the explosion of healthcare, but aging populations. So we have to do very nuanced industry specific, demographic specific marketing for job seekers very differently in Germany versus Japan, versus Canada, versus the US. Right. It is endlessly fascinating and again...

I run towards complexity and and it's a it's a heck of a lot of fun and people love the work that we do and it's so gratifying. I mean, I've worked at companies and I'm sure you've seen companies were marketing is kind of like, okay, yeah, whatever they're they're for sure, you're crazy thing, you wacky brand people. That is so not the case and at indeed, I mean people are passionate about the work that we do in marketing and excited about it and the partnership between sales and Marketings, I think, so positive, so supportive. I really it's really heartwarming. Yeah, and when you think, when you talk about the great realization. Tell me a little bit about that and how that impacts your marketing team and how you think about the great realization versus the great resignation. I think a lot of people are reassessing the role of work in their lives and what what they're willing to do. There are there are companies in Japan instituting four day work weeks. Panasonic just did this. There are countries in Europe, entire countries, that are banning work emails at night. Wow, so there is there is a brewing revolution in our conception of work and its role in our lives. Childcare is a huge issue and women have left the workforce during covid in shocking volume, and so thinking about how we make family care and support for women and caregivers actually work effectively in this new world of work is a giant social priority that we all must pay attention to. So yeah, I mean in our own work we are we run marketing targeted at women who've left the workforce and trying to bring them back into the workforce and helping them understand what kind of flexibility can they expect and demand, what kind of support, what kind of compensation but not just women. People in all sorts of industries are looking for new work arrangements and I think really to the the spiritual desire of people to connect with their work and feel supported by their management and feel that they have a voice in the direction of their organizations is rising rapidly and thank goodness that's good for everyone. Yeah, I agree. It's interesting that it was a long time coming and then it sped everything sped up and it's kind of here. You know. I mean covid has been horrible in so many regards, but it has been a catalyst for some social change that I think will...

...have long term positive effects. Where do you see the future of indeed going? We think about it every day now. So we have declared some really amazing ESG goals and for people who don't EESG is environmental, social and governance and basically they are our social pillars. So we have declared that we will get a hundred million people jobs by twenty thirty. Thirty million people of that will be people who face barriers to employment. Wow. So we are extremely committed to getting all people jobs that are well paid and satisfying and meaningful to them. But then very specifically focused on the issues facing women, people of Color, veterans, people with disabilities, people who face barriers to getting jobs and how can indeed empower them to find good jobs and break through those barriers. So that is a major, major area of focus for us and you'll see lots more work coming out on that. On that front, we are also very dedicated to employers, who are our partners and customers, and so I don't know if most people don't realize that glass door and indeed are part of the same company, and so we go to market and sell together as indeed and glass door to our customers, and glass door is an incredible tool on the employer branding front. And so helping companies understand how to manage their employer brand, how to get people to share reviews of their companies and CEOS and how educational those resources are. Two people seeking jobs, it's quite a tasty sandwich that we get to take out. Yeah, you know, you're the I think. Great thing about it, and here you talk is do you have successful, growing company that's, you know, number one in the category, doing really well, but it's naturally moving and inclined to having a purpose and it's sort of built into what you offer is the purpose of, you know, finding the right jobs for really for the world. But your specific number that you're trying to hit, of the thirty million out of the hundred million jobs, I think that rallies everyone. It's it's better to build a culture around tangible goals like that and you're all going towards the same thing, which you know you could not have that. You could just say we don't have those goals and we're just trying to people get jobs, help people get jobs, but having that adds that layer of purpose and satisfaction for people...

...day in and day out. Definitely No. I think having those North Stars of those goals is incredibly important and galvanizing. So wrapping up here, do you and this has been fantastic. I think it's we've learned a lot about indeed about you, about things that employees and employers can be thinking about. Do you feel like, in your experience going from hardcore consultant turning around businesses or helping businesses, going into marketing, kind of blending both? This is about soul and science. Do you feel are you? Is Is your approach? Do you think more head or heart? Is it more solar science. Is Jessica Jensen one or the other? I think that if you asked people who work with me, they would say I am a business lady first and a creative second. That may be accurate in my own mind and in my own heart, I think art and math are equally important and inextricably linked, and I my passion for what I do comes from the expression of our mission, our stories, the human experience of job seekers and how do we help them. But I was also died in the wool of business analytics. Yeah, and so you know that you can't. You can't take that out of the out of the found yeah, you need both, and it's a matter of is. What is it? Eight, twenty? Is it fifty? Fifty, is it? You know, I think that's it varies paytoday and week to week. Right. I mean I spent I spent some of my first few months at indeed doing our twenty two, you know. Okay, ours budget head count plans, you know, and that took up an incredible amount of head space. And then after we got that figured out, I'm able to spend more time engaging with the creative work. So, you know, it ebbs and flows. As well. Absolutely all right. Do you have any anything you feel has been left unsaid about Jessica Jensen in the world of marketing that you want to lay on US or discuss? How do you feel like we've covered? I mean we've covered a lot of ground. Has Been Super and I'll say I did some Improv comedy Ay in Los Angeles. I studied at the groundlings and my father is also hilarious, and so I...

...grew up with retred prior, Steve Martin. You know all of the all of the wonderful old comics, and I am dedicated to keep in the funny in business and I'm the most likely person to bring a rubber chicken to any meeting, oh my God. And so you know frequent use of muppet analogies and or video references. So I just encourage everyone to find time for comedy. And people are too shy to share it. Probably not in your world, in the creative advertising world, there's probably plenty of comedy, but good Lord, I will tell you in some other areas of business we need to laugh a hell of a lot more. I love that. What a what a great what a great Kapper to the conversation. I love that. That's great. Well, Jason, I would love to interview you. I want to hear all of your interior time. I would love that. Let's be do it. Let's do the Jay. Will you come talk to my marketing team? For sure. Yeah, anytime. That would be awesome. That was a great episode with Jessica Jensen from indeed, and I really took a lot out of that on how indeed is empowering workers and employers to support the workforce and the workplace, and I like how indeed is calling it the great realization Shin, which means we are adapting to the changing needs of both employees and employers, rather than focusing on the great resignation, which is a term we've all heard. Thanks so much for listening to soul in science and we'll see you next week. So in sciences, a mechanism podcast produced by the amazing Frank Risco, Ryan Tillotson, Tyler Nielsen, Emma Swanson and Sophie Morone, with the music by Kyle Marit. I'm your host, Jason Harris.

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